MEDICAL CERTIFICATION

The National Board of Certified Medical Interpreters (NBCMI). NBCMI is one of two national organizations to certify medical interpreters. Here's a direct link to the certification candidate handbook.

Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI). CCHI is one of two national organizations to certify medical interpreters. Here's a direct link to the candidate's examination bookThis organization has also introduced a civic engagement toolbox for healthcare interpreters

CCHI has collected advocacy resources from an array of organizations.

NBCMI is now hosting monthly webinars on how to prepare for written and oral certification exams.  Currently available to speakers of Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean and Vietnamese. 

CCHI offers the following page of certification resources

MEDICAL RESOURCES FOR INTERPRETERS

National Council on Interpreting in Health Care (NCIHC)
The NCIHC is a multidisciplinary organization based in the United States whose mission is to promote culturally competent professional health care interpreting as a means to support equal access to health care for individuals with limited English proficiency.
NCIHC published the National Code of Ethics and National Standards of Practice for Interpreters in Health Care.

NCIHC has also recently announced a valuable new resource for interpreter trainers and healthcare interpreters who work with patients who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or asexual (LGBTQIA). 

The Certification Commission of Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI) and Castle Worldwide, Inc have published results for the 2016 National Job Task Analysis Study for Healthcare Interpreters.

CCHI also has provided this "Civic Engagement Toolbox for Healthcare Interpreters".

International Medical Interpreting Association (IMIA): self-described as a "multidisciplinary organization whose mission is to promote and enhance language access in health care in the United States".

DiversityRX.org: This is one of the richest websites in the U.S. for articles, discussions and resources related to health care for culturally and linguistically diverse patients.

Think Cultural Health offers a wealth of other free resources, including free CME and CEU online courses (high quality) for doctors, nurses, first responders, oral health providers and health promoters.  Here is a video on how to work effectively with medical interpreters. It's a Think Cultural Health case study.

Health Information Translations offers a wealth of health information translated into more than a dozen languages; for example, what a 'bone marrow biopsy' is -- in Korean -- and what would be involved in preparing for this test.  Search by language, topic, or keyword.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists provides this video showing by example in a hospital setting the importance of having a qualified interpreter available.

The National Health Law program have provided the following report: The High Costs of Language Barriers in Medical Malpractice.

NHeLP

The National Health Law Program (NHeLP) is a nonprofit organization that supports access to health care for low-income residents. It has many excellent documents about language access and language services in health care. To see the page on LEP/language access publications, click here. This website should be checked regularly as NHeLP continues to publish many valuable documents relevant to the field of healthcare interpreting and language access.

CLAS STANDARDS

Federal standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS Standards) were developed by the Office of Minority Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CLAS Standards were created for organizations that offer health services.

This is a historic document: the first set of national standards to guide service delivery to immigrants, refugees and other diverse populations speaking many languages. Its impact extends well beyond health services. Although the 14 standards target health services, they are a critical resource for other community services. Four standards target language access; others target cultural barriers, cultural competence and institutional access. 

Ideally, administrators should read and apply these voluntary standards. For more information, including the final report, go to: http://www.omhrc.gov/clas/. (This is a large document.)

MEDICAL DICTIONARIES ONLINE

Spanish Medical Dictionaries

MANUAL MERCK DE INFORMACION MEDICA PARA EL HOGAR
ISBN 0911910-14-X ($34.95)
The entire manual is available for free consultation online.

ENGLISH-SPANISH DICTIONARY OF HEALTH RELATED TERMS
The dictionary can also be downloaded for free at: 
http://www.ucop.edu/cprc/cmhidictionary.pdf

Medical Dictionaries in Other Languages