The Language of Justice

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The Language of Justice

500.00

Dates: Dates to be confirmed, Spring 2018

Time: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Location: 10015 Old Columbia Road
                  Entrance A
                  Columbia, MD 21046

Audience: Legal interpreters, community interpreters and bilingual staff who perform legal interpreting in community settings, e.g., attorney-client interviews; Board hearings about the expulsion/suspension of students; nonprofit legal services; immigration counsel

Registration Deadline: To be confirmed

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An exciting, groundbreaking curriculum, this three-day legal interpreter training is the only national program for legal interpreting in community settings. The training manual for The Language of Justice was authored by four experts across the country, including an attorney as well specialists in legal and community interpreting. The lead author is Isabel Framer, former Chair of the National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators. The curriculum includes an overview of the legal interpreting profession, requirements and procedures, a model code of ethics and standards of practice, linguistic mediation techniques, legal terminology and an overview of the U.S. legal system.

View course syllabus

View course syllabus

Designed for court and community interpreters, this unique curriculum was developed by the authors with the support of a team of attorneys, national interpreting experts, two law professors, legal services agencies and nonprofit community services.

The course fee includes a 125-page training manual (retail: $45) and 62-page workbook (retail: $25).

Both community and court interpreters need guidance on how to perform effective legal interpreting in community settings. Unlike the courtroom, most legal interpreting in the community is collaborative, not adversarial. Examples may include interpreting for:

  • An attorney at a domestic violence center.
  • A medical exam requested by an insurance company following a car accident.
  • Immigration services provided by a lawyer or paralegal.
  • A child abuse or neglect investigation by Child Protective Services.
  • Special Education meetings in school settings.

Feedback from past session participants:

Instructor is fantastic, very professional, patient, great public speaker and clear delivery of concepts.

Excellent on what is expected in legal justice interpreting, audiences with attorney and client

Great presenters, great material, even balance of teaching and "doing".

Thank you for a great program. It was really a privilege and an honor to be instructed by such a great group of professionals..

This program includes a certificate and is approved by the Maryland Court Interpreter Program for 16 CE credits, by the Pennsylvania Interpreter Certification Program (ICP) for 12 CEUs, by the Judicial Council of California for 18 CIMCE credits, by the Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services for 4 DSHS CECs and by the American Translators Association for 10 ATA CEPs.