How to Work with an Interpreter

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sale

How to Work with an Interpreter

80.00 95.00

EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT EXPIRES APRIL 5, 2019

Dates: May 10, 2019 (Friday)

Time: 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Location: Ecker Business Training Center
                  6751 Columbia Gateway Drive
                  Columbia, MD 21046

Audience: Service providers, administrators and front-line staff in medical, social services, educational, legal and law enforcement settings.

Registration Deadline: April 26, 2019

SAVE UP TO $40 when you register for How to Work with an Interpreter and Cultural Competence in Health and Human Services. Offer ends April 19, 2019. Learn more.

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This half-day workshop is one of our most popular! It offers a practical, skills-based introduction to working effectively with interpreters in a variety of settings. Whether you work in healthcare, schools or almost any community service today, this workshop will help you better serve Limited English Proficient (LEP) clients or patients. There is also a special focus on how to work with both qualified and untrained interpreters.

Participants will learn about:

  • Legal requirements for language access

  • Interpreting versus translation

  • Best practices for telephone and video interpreting

  • How to work with qualified and untrained interpreters

  • Working with bilingual staff versus contract interpreters

This in-depth, hands-on workshop opens eyes, builds skills and helps participants to understand that working effectively with an interpreter is key to providing services to LEP clients and patients.

And if you think interpreting is easy...we'll show you just what it takes -- and even give you a chance to try it out for yourself!

Audience

  • Health and allied professionals, including doctors and nurses

  • Mental health providers

  • Social workers

  • Front-line, clerical, human resources and support staff

  • Teachers, principals, reading specialists and other school staff

  • Staff in other education programs, from preschool to community and four-year colleges and universities

  • Bilingual employees (who are not interpreters)

  • Speech and occupational therapists

  • Victim services and child advocacy staff

  • Case managers

  • Government social services employees, such as income support specialists, caseworkers and child protective services investigators

  • Nonprofit staff in human and social services

  • Community action staff

 
 

CEUs pending.

From our past participants:

[I learned to] focus on the client, reduce focus on the interpreter, [as I'm] fulfilling language needs.

I will use this info in working with families we [serve].

Enjoyed the role playing more than usual in classes like these. Instructor made information relevant and stay in my memory. Great presentation style.

Gave me knowledge on the difference between interpreters versus translators. Also trained versus untrained.

Role plays helped me experience how important accurate interpreting is and how much attentiveness it requires.